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Basics of Buoyancy for Babies

Buoyancy is key to being able to swim. Knowing what it is and how to utilise it when swimming or teaching your baby to swim will go a long way to ensure that this is done safely. We found a great tutorial that will help you with the basic. There is a transcript below, to help you follow along if needed.

You’ll be learning the fundamental skills
required to learn each of the six
official swimming strokes these skills
will be the foundation of everything
that you will need to accomplish in your
journey to becoming a lifelong swimmer
the basis to all of swimming revolves
around how well you can control your
body in the water when swimming any
stroke you should always be working
towards being as efficient as possible
whenever possible before learning how to
float on the water you will need to
master the art of breath control knowing
when to breathe and when not to breathe
while on the water will be crucial to
being a successful swimmer when your
face is in the water you will not be
able to inhale any air therefore you
will need to be able to control when and
how you take your breaths while swimming
it is important to remember that you
should never inhale water while swimming
only breathe in when your mouth is out
of the water many new swimmers think
that you need to hold your breath
underwater however as with any form of
exercise a pattern of inhaling and
exhaling needs to be established
exhaling in the water also known as
blowing bubbles is the first step to
having proper breath control
before you begin blowing bubbles
remember to fill your lungs with air by
taking a deep breath above water start
by lowering your face in the water to
where your mouth is submerged just below
the surface close your lips so that you
only allow air to exit from a small hole
in the center of your mouth exhale
slowly maintaining a steady stream of
bubbles for as long as you can without
any gaps and exhaling the longer that
you were able to exhale with one steady
stream of bubbles the more breath
control you will have another form of
breath control that is important while
swimming is to be able to blow bubbles
from your nose start by lowering your
face into the water to where your mouth
and nose are submerged just below the
surface this time making sure to close
your lips so that no water will be able
to enter your mouth exhale slowly
through your nose maintaining a steady
stream of bubbles for as long as you can
without any gaps in exhaling
a popular exercise to work on quick
breathing is emotion called the Bob for
this motion you can blow bubbles out of
your mouth your nose or a combination of
both the challenge comes with inhaling
air quickly start by getting a deep
breath of air and blowing bubbles with
any method that you feel comfortable
with doing as you are close to expending
all of the air in your lungs come up for
another breath the goal is to only
breathe in once before lowering your
face back into the water again
to blow more bubbles try to see how many
Bob’s you can do in a row without
stopping floating is the foundation for
every stroke in the water having the
ability to easily float on the surface
of the water will affect how well you
will be able to learn future swimming
strokes the front float is a stationary
body position in the water for the
duration of the float your whole body
should remain still and relaxed the
first step to having a successful front
float is for you to raise your body
properly to the surface of the water in
order to do so find an area of your pool
that is between chest and shoulder deep
start by raising both of your arms
towards the surface of the water
palms down while bending your legs
slightly at the knees take a deep breath
and kick off the bottom of the pool
gently with both feet as you kick off
the bottom of the pool
lower your face into the water
comfortably to where your ears are just
below the surface of the water your body
will naturally float from your chest
when holding your breath your lungs act
in a similar manner it’s balloons
assisting your body with floating on top
of the water remember the front float is
a stationary position once you have
jumped to the top of the water you
should not be fighting to stay on the
surface there are three general rules
that should be followed in order to
perform the front float effectively hold
your breath look down towards the bottom
of the pool and relax your muscles
the more air you have in your lungs the
easier and more buoyant your body will
be lower your eyes to look at the floor
directly below your head this will
straighten your spine allowing your hips
to rise to the surface of the water
after successfully floating on your
front you will need to make sure to
dismount from your float correctly start
by bringing your knees up towards your
chest this will slowly lower your hips
in the water pull your hands back and a
large sweeping motion keeping the palms
of your hands facing in the direction
that your arms are pulling as your hips
lower in the water drive your feet
straight down to the bottom of the pool
a common mistake among newer swimmers is
to look forwards in the water during the
float this will flex your lower back
driving your hips down towards the
bottom of the pool another common
mistake is jumping above the water to
start your float remember you need to
jump up to the surface of the water not
above similar to the front float the
back float is a stationary body position
in the water start by raising both of
your arms towards the surface of the
water palms up
while bending your legs slightly at the
knees rest the back of your head on the
surface of the water so that your
irresistible urge just below the surface
take a deep breath and kick off the
bottom of the pool gently with both feet
as you kick off the bottom of the pool
your head should stay in the same
relative position if done correctly your
torso alleged should race to the surface
of the water remember the back float is
a stationary position in order to
perform the back float effectively there
are four general rules that need to be
followed hold your breath chin up chest
up and hips up the more air you have in
your lungs the easier and more buoyant
you’re floating will be while on your
back raise your chin up slightly pass
the neutral resting position this will
pause your lower back to flex raising
your hips towards the surface of the
water
broaden your shoulders this will allow
your chest to be as high on top of the
water as possible which will raise your
hips as well as your overall body
position if done properly your face
should never go underwater for the
duration of the back float after
successfully floating on your back you
will need to make sure to dismount from
the float correct
start by bringing your knees up towards
your chest this will begin to lower your
hips in the water as your hips start to
lower pull your hands down and forwards
in a large sweeping motion keeping your
palms facing in the direction that your
arms are pulling as your hips lower in
the water drive your feet straight down
to the bottom of the pool
three common mistakes among newer
swimmers who are learning the back float
or to not hold your breath lowering your
chin and jumping above the surface of
the water the front glide and back glide
operate in a very similar manner to the
front float and back float both glides
utilize a stationary body position in
the water while performing either glide
your whole body should remain still and
relaxed in addition both glides are
designed to be the most efficient form
of travel in the water in the future
gliding will be a necessary part of
several strokes learning to utilize the
efficiency of each glide will be an
important step towards becoming a better
swimmer in order to perform the front
glide reach both of your arms straight
above your head placing both hands
directly on top of each other with your
palms facing down towards the bottom of
the pool your legs should be straight in
together with your knees and ankles
relaxed similar to the front float your
chin and eyes should be pointed towards
the bottom of the pool
your head should rest comfortably just
at the surface of the water with your
ears submerged since your arms and legs
do not move for the front and back glide
you will need to utilize a wall to kick
off of in the water while standing close
to any chest or shoulder deep wall lower
your face into the water and straighten
your arms in front of your body to the
glide position place one or both of your
feet up against the wall and push off
lightly if done properly your body
should raise to the surface of the water
while gliding effortlessly after a few
seconds of gliding dismount in the same
manner that you would during the front
float the positioning for the back glide
works in a very similar manner is the
front glide the only differences are
that your face and palm should be facing
upwards while performing the back line
make sure to keep your chin raised
slightly past the neutral resting
position for the back glide stand next
to any chest or shoulder deep water
press the back of your head on the
surface of the water so that your ears
are submerged just below
servus place one or both of your feet up
against the wall and push off lightly at
the same moment that you kick off from
the wall straighten both of your arms in
front of your head to the backlights
position if done properly your whole
body should raise to the surface of the
water while gliding effortlessly after a
few seconds of gliding dismount in the
same manner as you would during the back
float thank you for watching swim life
pro’s tutorial on the basics of buoyancy
please make sure to check out our other
video tutorials in each of the six
official strokes and treading water @ww
so life procom

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