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Basics of Buoyancy for Babies

Buoyancy is key to being able to swim. Knowing what it is and how to utilise it when swimming or teaching your baby to swim will go a long way to ensure that this is done safely. We found a great tutorial that will help you with the basic. There is a transcript below, to help you follow along if needed.

You’ll be learning the fundamental skills
required to learn each of the six
official swimming strokes these skills
will be the foundation of everything
that you will need to accomplish in your
journey to becoming a lifelong swimmer
the basis to all of swimming revolves
around how well you can control your
body in the water when swimming any
stroke you should always be working
towards being as efficient as possible
whenever possible before learning how to
float on the water you will need to
master the art of breath control knowing
when to breathe and when not to breathe
while on the water will be crucial to
being a successful swimmer when your
face is in the water you will not be
able to inhale any air therefore you
will need to be able to control when and
how you take your breaths while swimming
it is important to remember that you
should never inhale water while swimming
only breathe in when your mouth is out
of the water many new swimmers think
that you need to hold your breath
underwater however as with any form of
exercise a pattern of inhaling and
exhaling needs to be established
exhaling in the water also known as
blowing bubbles is the first step to
having proper breath control
before you begin blowing bubbles
remember to fill your lungs with air by
taking a deep breath above water start
by lowering your face in the water to
where your mouth is submerged just below
the surface close your lips so that you
only allow air to exit from a small hole
in the center of your mouth exhale
slowly maintaining a steady stream of
bubbles for as long as you can without
any gaps and exhaling the longer that
you were able to exhale with one steady
stream of bubbles the more breath
control you will have another form of
breath control that is important while
swimming is to be able to blow bubbles
from your nose start by lowering your
face into the water to where your mouth
and nose are submerged just below the
surface this time making sure to close
your lips so that no water will be able
to enter your mouth exhale slowly
through your nose maintaining a steady
stream of bubbles for as long as you can
without any gaps in exhaling
a popular exercise to work on quick
breathing is emotion called the Bob for
this motion you can blow bubbles out of
your mouth your nose or a combination of
both the challenge comes with inhaling
air quickly start by getting a deep
breath of air and blowing bubbles with
any method that you feel comfortable
with doing as you are close to expending
all of the air in your lungs come up for
another breath the goal is to only
breathe in once before lowering your
face back into the water again
to blow more bubbles try to see how many
Bob’s you can do in a row without
stopping floating is the foundation for
every stroke in the water having the
ability to easily float on the surface
of the water will affect how well you
will be able to learn future swimming
strokes the front float is a stationary
body position in the water for the
duration of the float your whole body
should remain still and relaxed the
first step to having a successful front
float is for you to raise your body
properly to the surface of the water in
order to do so find an area of your pool
that is between chest and shoulder deep
start by raising both of your arms
towards the surface of the water
palms down while bending your legs
slightly at the knees take a deep breath
and kick off the bottom of the pool
gently with both feet as you kick off
the bottom of the pool
lower your face into the water
comfortably to where your ears are just
below the surface of the water your body
will naturally float from your chest
when holding your breath your lungs act
in a similar manner it’s balloons
assisting your body with floating on top
of the water remember the front float is
a stationary position once you have
jumped to the top of the water you
should not be fighting to stay on the
surface there are three general rules
that should be followed in order to
perform the front float effectively hold
your breath look down towards the bottom
of the pool and relax your muscles
the more air you have in your lungs the
easier and more buoyant your body will
be lower your eyes to look at the floor
directly below your head this will
straighten your spine allowing your hips
to rise to the surface of the water
after successfully floating on your
front you will need to make sure to
dismount from your float correctly start
by bringing your knees up towards your
chest this will slowly lower your hips
in the water pull your hands back and a
large sweeping motion keeping the palms
of your hands facing in the direction
that your arms are pulling as your hips
lower in the water drive your feet
straight down to the bottom of the pool
a common mistake among newer swimmers is
to look forwards in the water during the
float this will flex your lower back
driving your hips down towards the
bottom of the pool another common
mistake is jumping above the water to
start your float remember you need to
jump up to the surface of the water not
above similar to the front float the
back float is a stationary body position
in the water start by raising both of
your arms towards the surface of the
water palms up
while bending your legs slightly at the
knees rest the back of your head on the
surface of the water so that your
irresistible urge just below the surface
take a deep breath and kick off the
bottom of the pool gently with both feet
as you kick off the bottom of the pool
your head should stay in the same
relative position if done correctly your
torso alleged should race to the surface
of the water remember the back float is
a stationary position in order to
perform the back float effectively there
are four general rules that need to be
followed hold your breath chin up chest
up and hips up the more air you have in
your lungs the easier and more buoyant
you’re floating will be while on your
back raise your chin up slightly pass
the neutral resting position this will
pause your lower back to flex raising
your hips towards the surface of the
water
broaden your shoulders this will allow
your chest to be as high on top of the
water as possible which will raise your
hips as well as your overall body
position if done properly your face
should never go underwater for the
duration of the back float after
successfully floating on your back you
will need to make sure to dismount from
the float correct
start by bringing your knees up towards
your chest this will begin to lower your
hips in the water as your hips start to
lower pull your hands down and forwards
in a large sweeping motion keeping your
palms facing in the direction that your
arms are pulling as your hips lower in
the water drive your feet straight down
to the bottom of the pool
three common mistakes among newer
swimmers who are learning the back float
or to not hold your breath lowering your
chin and jumping above the surface of
the water the front glide and back glide
operate in a very similar manner to the
front float and back float both glides
utilize a stationary body position in
the water while performing either glide
your whole body should remain still and
relaxed in addition both glides are
designed to be the most efficient form
of travel in the water in the future
gliding will be a necessary part of
several strokes learning to utilize the
efficiency of each glide will be an
important step towards becoming a better
swimmer in order to perform the front
glide reach both of your arms straight
above your head placing both hands
directly on top of each other with your
palms facing down towards the bottom of
the pool your legs should be straight in
together with your knees and ankles
relaxed similar to the front float your
chin and eyes should be pointed towards
the bottom of the pool
your head should rest comfortably just
at the surface of the water with your
ears submerged since your arms and legs
do not move for the front and back glide
you will need to utilize a wall to kick
off of in the water while standing close
to any chest or shoulder deep wall lower
your face into the water and straighten
your arms in front of your body to the
glide position place one or both of your
feet up against the wall and push off
lightly if done properly your body
should raise to the surface of the water
while gliding effortlessly after a few
seconds of gliding dismount in the same
manner that you would during the front
float the positioning for the back glide
works in a very similar manner is the
front glide the only differences are
that your face and palm should be facing
upwards while performing the back line
make sure to keep your chin raised
slightly past the neutral resting
position for the back glide stand next
to any chest or shoulder deep water
press the back of your head on the
surface of the water so that your ears
are submerged just below
servus place one or both of your feet up
against the wall and push off lightly at
the same moment that you kick off from
the wall straighten both of your arms in
front of your head to the backlights
position if done properly your whole
body should raise to the surface of the
water while gliding effortlessly after a
few seconds of gliding dismount in the
same manner as you would during the back
float thank you for watching swim life
pro’s tutorial on the basics of buoyancy
please make sure to check out our other
video tutorials in each of the six
official strokes and treading water @ww
so life procom

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How to Introduce a baby to swimming

The way that you introduce your baby to swim will have a lasting impact on how they relate to the activity. If you get it wrong, they will highly unlikely be too keen to take part in it again. Doing it the right way to ensure that they are safe and happy to give it another go. We found a straightforward guide that will talk you through the process.

Here is our review of teaching a baby to swim.

I’m going to talk you through
safe entry into the waters day for your
baby firstly what you need to remember
is that you don’t ever carry a baby down
steps or down a ladder into the water
the reason for this is if you slip
you’re going to take your baby with you
which we don’t recommend at all what we
do recommend is a change in mat which
you can get wet so you get the changing
mat wet in the water first and then lay
it on the side of the pool right next to
the surface of the water
you can then kneel down and lay your
baby flat on that change mats it’s nice
and warm this stops them going straight
onto the cold concrete on the side of
the pool which isn’t a great
introduction to their first lesson into
the water when you’re laying your baby
down on the mat ensure that their feet
are pointing towards the water with
their head the other way you can then
sit down next to them you put one arm
across your baby this is your safety arm
this is to stop your baby rolling either
side and ensures that it’s safer for
them before they get into the water and
ensure they can’t roll into the water on
their own once you’ve got this safety
arm across your baby you can then gently
slide into the water yourself turning as
you do so once you’re in the water you
then put both of your hands behind your
baby’s head and neck to make sure that’s
fully supported in your own time gently
lean your baby towards you and bring
them in towards the water safely this is
a much more controlled way of taking
your baby into the water rather than
carrying them down the steps if you are
going swimming with somebody else they
can help you by putting their arms
across their baby on the change mat what
we don’t recommend is that that other
person passes the baby to in the water
and passes them across the air this is
also because if they slip or if they
drop the baby that’s quite a long way
for them to fall so it’s much safer to
lay that baby down on the mat and bring
them into the water safely in this
advice video we’re going to talk about
swings and dips swings and dips is an
activity that encourages your baby to
spend a little bit
of time in the water flats on their back
to start with you swing your baby up in
a seated position always supporting
their head and neck and then gently rock
them flat on the surface of the water if
your baby is happy flat on the water
then you would keep them there for as
long as possible and then sit them up
just a little bit if your baby isn’t too
keen on being flat on the water on their
back then you can sit them up for a
little bit longer and then gently rock
them flat on their back to give them a
few seconds in this position and then
sit them back up again when your baby is
flat on the water it gives them a chance
to have their ears in the water and get
used to that pressure change and what it
feels like to have also going in there
is before you sit them back up again
it’s a really fun activity and a great
way for you to bond with your baby for
lots of smiley faces and lots of eye
contact try and make it as fun as
possible thank you for listening to our
video about swings and dips in this
video we’re going to talk through
breathing activities and why it’s
important to teach breathing activities
from a young age as early as possible we
introduce these activities to encourage
your baby to learn when they’re swimming
to breathe in above the water and
breathe out under the water which is a
very natural way of swimming you support
your baby’s head with two hands behind
their head and neck and bring them in
towards you sitting them up a little bit
breathe in above the water and then
gently blow bubbles into the water your
baby won’t be copying you yet but they
will be watching and learning and when
they’re a bit older they’ll want to
start copying you if your baby does have
good head and neck control then you can
go to a slightly more supported hold
either side of their tummy which is one
hand either side of their tummy nice
relaxed hold and again practice those
bubbles breathing above the water and
breathe out onto the water make it
really fun and in little a while your
baby will start to copy you in this
video we’re going to explain how you can
help your babies start to learn how to
keep their legs in the water always need
to make sure their head and neck is
supported you can bring their head in
towards your chest a bit more or if not
keep them high up on your shoulder so
you note their mouth is clear of the
water you can use your hand or hands to
help them kick their legs depending on
how you’re supporting their head and
neck this will eventually lead to them
learning how to
use that propulsion in the water by
kicking their legs you can do lots of
games of seeing lots of songs in the
water to keep them entertained whilst
you’re practicing kicking their legs
builds up the muscles in their legs and
through their spine as well so you can
help them either side of their legs
using your hands to help them kick those
legs whilst they’re in the water all of
these activities are really good
restricting your muscles and help them
learn how to push themselves forwards in
the water in this video we’re going to
talk about splashing hands in the water
when you’re swimming with your baby
splashing hands is obviously a really
fun thing to do first it gets little
bits of water flicking up onto your
baby’s face which if they start to learn
that from a very young age they’ll
understand that’s very normal and if
they’re going swimming they will get
bits of water in their face and they’ll
learn that’s very normal when they do go
swimming with you you can help them to
start with so you can support them with
one arm across their tummy and chest and
use your spare hand to help them splash
their hands in the water if they’re not
so keen on it then you can let go of
that hand that’s helping them splash
their hands and do it for them splash
next to them say get a feel of what it’s
like and then as they get a bit older or
maybe a little bit later on they might
then want to help and you can hold their
hand and help them splash again it’s a
really really fun activity and our
movements in the water do lead to
paddling and then obviously on to
swimming on their front putting that
water behind them we’re going to talk
you through walk floating now and this
walk floating will be with your baby on
their tummy this is for babies that are
a lot more wrigley and often don’t like
being on their back anymore or it’s
unsafe for them to be on their back need
to make sure that we have a light hand
supporting either side of their tummy
and your thumbs can be in a V position
to start with this is to support their
head and neck a little bit and if their
chin starts to drop your hands are there
to support them you still move backwards
so that your baby is going forwards and
their head is going first
it’s a really good chance for you to
have a bonding experience with your baby
and to give that good eye to eyes
contact
lots and lots of smiley faces to
encourage your baby to stay relaxed in
the water you can gently move them side
to side to get them used to that water
moving across their body if they’re
still very relaxed and if they’ve got
very good head and neck control you can
then go to a bit more of a
laxed hold this is where you tuck your
thumbs underneath the shoulders of your
baby and your hands are flat underneath
their tummy you can position your hands
slightly pointing upwards a little bit
to encourage their chin in their mouth
to be above the water you’re still
moving backwards and your baby is still
going forwards but this position gives
them a lot more freedom in the water
again nice relaxed hands and you can
gently sway them side to side as well if
they want to feel that water moving a
little bit more we’re going to talk you
through walk floating now and we’re
going to start with walk floating on
your baby’s back so the important thing
to remember is that to start with you
always support your baby’s head and neck
and you also support underneath their
seat this is so that it’s not too much
strain on their back when we’re
practicing walk floating on the baby’s
back it’s to encourage that movement of
water across their body and to get them
used to what it feels like to be moving
in water when you do start to move and
your baby has got a bit of momentum in
the water you can then release that hand
that’s underneath their seat this gives
them a lot more independence and a lot
more freedom in the water to feel that
water moving all the time that you’re
moving backwards and your baby’s head is
going first you can just keep that one
hand underneath their head and neck this
is because the water is supporting the
back of their body and their seat and
their legs the muscles in their legs are
much denser generally than the fat that
is in their tummy and their arms so all
the time that you’re moving it’s fine to
keep that one hand underneath their head
and neck however if you stop moving at
any point you must put that hand back
underneath their seat if you don’t it
can cause their legs to sink a bit in
the water and it puts a lot of strain on
their neck now if your baby is starting
to move a bit more or you’d like to give
them a little bit more independence but
they’re still happy on their back we
then go to what’s called a cheek support
which is two hands either side of their
cheek again all the time you’re moving
this is fine but if you stop you need to
go back to supporting underneath their
seat again we keep babies on their back
for as long as possible
firstly it’s a good survival skill to
learn how to float in water and how to
keep their mouth above the water but
it’s also very good for their alignment
when they’re swimming
it’s much easier to teach a flat natural
swim alignment with a baby on their back
than it is if a baby is on their tummy
we’re going to talk through a safe exit
out of the water now when you’re
swimming with your baby again the same
as when you get a baby into the water we
would recommend that you use a change
mat and get it wet so it’s nice and warm
and lay that flat next to the pool if
you’re swimming on your own and the
freeboard is quite low freeboard is the
edge of the pool in comparison to the
edge of the water so if there’s not much
difference there you can lay your baby
on that change map again with their feet
pointing towards the water you then put
one arm across your baby and climb out
onto the side of the pool next to your
baby the reason why we recommend that
you keep that arm across your baby at
all times is because if they do roll
your arm is there to stop the rolling
into the water if the freeboard is very
high and there are integrated steps in
the water like there is at this pool
here we can lay them out as close to the
steps as possible again you lay your
baby on this change mat in the same way
as before so their feet are pointing
towards the water you can then start to
walk out of the steps keeping your arms
either side and then when you feel it’s
safe to do so you can climb out on the
side of the pool next to your baby if
you’re lucky enough to be going swimming
with somebody else that can help you
then one of you can get out of the water
first and go around next to the change
map and the other person can gently lay
their baby on that warm change map again
with their feet pointing towards the
water you can keep your arms either side
of your baby whilst the other person
then takes a baby from the mat up into
the air as normal that then gives you a
chance to get out of the water without
having to worry about carrying them out
of a ladder or steps and slipping and
possibly taking your baby with you this
is a much safe way to get out of the
pool thank you very much for watching
our video for more videos please head
over to our youtube channel or for our
latest products please head over to
simply swim calm

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Easy Steps for Teaching Kids to Swim

Teaching your little one to swim can be daunting to start with. You do not know how much to push them or how much to ask of them. However, you know that it is imperative that they pick up this life skill. Most of us take them to a class where they can learn with their peers. Leading up to that, you can also ensure that not only are they prepared, but you are too. As such, we found this great resource online, that will get you started on the right track.

Check out our post on a Baby Swimming Training Review.

Tips the teaching infants one warm up
the class to give clear instructions and
three always keep your class moving five
to 12 months old group teaching class I
like to start the class warm up picking
on the ledge it gives the children a
feeling of security and familiarity
behind you there’s some small cups would
like you to give them a couple of quick
conditionings don’t forget it’s the
child’s name Java ready
make sure you give good visual
demonstrations now we’re all going over
the rope just seen it upright kicks try
to make sure when you kick that you try
to get pressure on that part of the
child’s foot there so it’s little kicks
like that you see so we go over to the
rope assisting the kick coming back
encouraging them to kick touch little
kicks over and it’s nice and I’ll kick
kick kick kick kick kick kick kick kick
kick kick kick coming back and sit them
over the ledge and let them pull up by
themselves okay we’ve got five of those
away we go
all together ready
where possible he control and move the
class together
and to conditioning cups to conditioning
cups start with small conditioning
covers in the notice how I’m keeping the
class murder bolting all parents and
praising good work notice how I move to
be central to the action
this becomes a good teaching position
because when here I am able to
communicate and encourage both parents
in children
and good teachers always building skills
now importantly I increase the pool from
a couple to a bucket of extending the
children it’s breath control like this
so it’s timidly mine so it’s five second
for Levi ready go 1 2 3 4 and 5
excellent for a good walk back to mommy
the poles
very good and seated up wide kicks to
the rope and back again just two more of
these just two more of these warming up
seen it up right over
as a teacher always be conscious where
you position yourself so that you can
communicate I do this independently by
themselves
I pledge book and two more large cups
please
two more buckets the count of five chemo
buckets
remember correct mistakes and have fun
with the parents what we want to try to
do when we’re pouring this water is not
come from a great height and plunk it
straight on them let’s try to have it
run smoothly out of the face like this
Levi ready everyone
just one more make sure it’s a nice
smooth ball once you’ve warmed the class
up you can now start to introduce other
schools okay guys next this is what
we’re going to do going over we’re
simply doing some vestibular stimulation
so going across to the right it’s the
stimulus stimulation like this left ear
right here and then on your back then
left ear stay nice and low right here
then on your back then left ear
on the back cross to the right and then
we’re coming back the same line except
now
ready go 1 2 3 4 and they pull up by
themselves up again hope again it’s hard
to get good help come on so we’re going
over vestibular stimulation coming back
to carriage anatella can you see how
we’ve progressed the skills firstly
breath control from a small cup to a
large bucket and now these skills from
simply holding on and pulling up onto
the ledge to submerging the child for
five seconds and encouraging them to
pull up from an underwater position this
is good progressive teaching
yeah the rest times 10 to 15 seconds and
then away we go again left ear right
here encourage on the back left ear
right here encourage on the back and
give them that very smooth quote and
pull up at the end one yogurt left ear
right here
that’s a good girl that’s excellent
boy toy gun good boy
good good
nice that’s a good girl just very
greatly when you’re getting close I
wanted just a little fun at the end such
like this it’s like this Levi
ready go it’s up and down and a little
just a little gentle fun at the end baby
horn to tap them if necessary
come on up you get come on come on good
boy yeah so I to do it so just again
right at the end we’re just doing it
this way from here
it’s Levi ready go it’s up and down and
hold and last in flight and then just
get there and encourage him to get up
come on look up get up get up
whoops good boy

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Teaching Your infant to Swim

While searching for practical resources for teaching infants to swim, we found this incredible video that we would like to share with you. This is a resource that will put you in a position to train your child to swim safely. They will become confident in the water.

If you would like a step by step course for teaching babies to swim, be sure to check out the post we linked to.

In the beginning phases of this you have to teach the baby to close the mouth and open the eyes
to the sensation of being underwater.
I’m feeling her breathing cycle here with my hands and as she inhales, I
take her underwater. So the first time, when she goes underwater, she
she’s already inhaled maximally and the chances of her taking in any water or swallowing it
are remote so she comes up, there’s no crying, there’s no sputtering, there’s no coughing.
There’s no verbal cue. But there is
a hand cue. Watch my hands very closely here
and you’ll see the cue. Good. Alright now,
then you take the child to the wall, teach them to hold on,
pressing down on the fingertips. Create a little turbulence here for them so they have to hold on a little tighter.
Always protect the chin. And now see if they’ll take it in the air. Good.
Now let’s combine being underwater, coming to the surface and
taking the wall. There’s the cue,
there’s the behavior. Now we are going to introduce a slight angle.
So for rotation of the core you take this hand, and this sets up a little bit of the
oblique musculature, the abdominal musculature,
and the lats and so forth. Ready? Say go? Student: Go.
And now we’re going to have her exposed a little longer underwater.
And she tolerates that well. Now let’s combine everything.
Have her take a 180-degree turn and take the wall.
Now let’s change the orientation so the rotation means air.
Here’s the rotation, there’s the air.
We’ll do it again.
Here’s the rotation, there’s the air. Good.
Next you teach the child to float on the back.
Natural buoyancy of the water toward a human body is slightly positive
so she floats simply because she’s a normal human being.
Look at me, look at my eyes. You have to teach a good head orientation. Good.
One, two, three, four, five. And my arms are just exactly
like the buoyancy of the water except they’re more amplified and they can be more controlled.
Look at my eyes, Sophia. Good girl. Head orientation is vital.
Ready? One, two, three. Ah, ah, look at my eyes. One, two, three,
four, five. Good. Wait on your back until I count to five and then I’ll pick you up.
Look at my eyes, look at my glasses. Ready?
One, two, three, four, five, good.
Now we reintroduce a slight angle to it so that she’s got to finish
the float like that. And eventually you set this up—
one, two, three, four, five—so
that she can go from this position and go onto her back and float.
One, two, three, four, five. On her own. One, two, three, four, five.
Ready? Say go. Student: Go.
And I’m giving her some control there, that’s part of the psychology of working with a child.
They need to feel like they’ve got some control in the environment.
So I ask her to signal herself. Say go. Student: Go.
Sophia, that was nice. Turn over and get my hand, I’ll pick you up. One, two, three, four, five.
Go! Go, Sophia. Good.
That was combined because she was able to come off of the wall and
get my hand so she trusts my hands.
Can you say go? Student: Go.
Very nice. Now we’ve got a good head-down posture,
we’ve got nice feet at the surface.
Ninety-five percent of swimming and floating for babies is about body orientation
since their torso is such a large portion of their body.
What we’re really teaching her here
is a lot of the athleticism that comes from knowing where your body parts are
in space. Say go. Student: Go. Get my hand.
The difference is, water slows everything down and that’s
very nice cognitively for a child of this age
because then they can incorporate the sequences that are going much slower for them.
Kind of like learning how to do a snatch in CrossFit, everything happens very, very quickly
and it’s got to be timed perfectly. This is a situation where
due to the density of water, it slows the process down a bit,
and she has an opportunity to see and practice how various other aspects of her movement
or her lack of movement influence the environment that she’s in. Give me five.
And again, you’re always working from the psychological end of the
attention span, the physical and the emerging personality of
an infant or a young child. Say go.
Student: Go.
When you can use language meaningfully, you’re no longer an infant. Now you’re
a child. So I’m matching some of the voabulary
aspects of Sophia.
and some of her skills, verbally, along with her cognitive development
and her personality. Turn over and get the wall. There we go. Get my hand. Good.
So I didn’t have her struggle all the way to the wall there, but
I had her come to my hand which is intermediate. Now
I’m going to pull her in with the hand, pull it away and now she takes it. So now
she’s thinking, “Hm, I can take the wall by myself.”
“I don’t need the hand target.” Let’s see what she does. Go!
Perfect. Very nice.
Her mom is in the back here always watching the lesson so that I have another pair of educated eyes watching the lesson.
for any safety issue or protocol that may be of concern during the lesson.
And the mom is keeping track of some things for us. Mom, here we go with the constriction check.
And it’s a 3. What are we at, 7 minutes? Mom: 8:08.
Say go. Student: Go.
Good girl, Sophia. Come back and get me, go.
Come and get me, Sophia.
On your back. Good girl. Oh,
mom. Sophia turn over and get my hand go. Now there’s the entire swim sequence.
Mom: That is awesome. That was it right there, I can’t believe it.
Mom: That was really cool.
Coming off the wall. Here’s the whole sequence.
I’ve been doing this for 46 years and I have goosebumps.
I’m serious, look at my goosebumps. I am not
kidding.
Say go. Come get me, go!
On your back.
Sophia, come get me. Go!
On your back, Sophia. Nice.
Oh my gosh. On a Monday no less.
Come get me, Sophia. Go. Haha!
Wooo! Give me five, girl. Alright, now,
here it comes, this is a tough one.
Because she sees that wall and she sees the gate.
If she’ll do it here, then we’ve got her. Say go.
Student: go.
On your back, Sophia, on your back, on your back.
Nope. She sees that wall and that’s the finish line. OK.
So I’ve got to slow her down a little bit. Alright, Sophia, here we go.
Sayyyyyy … Student: Go
On your back, Sophia, on your back.
She isn’t going to do it. Not today.
I’ve got a little trick here, what I’m going to do since I can feel her breathing,
I’m going to let her go on no air.
Say go. Student: Go. On your back.
Turn over and get the wall, Sophia. Go, Sophia, go!
Mom: All right!
One last time and you’re out of here.
Constriction check at … Mom: 10:53. She’s done.
This is it, say go. Student: Go.
On your back, Sophia, on your back. Good.
Turn it over and get the wall and you’re done, go home, bye!
Oh my gosh!
Mom is a little excited.
Very nice! Woo!

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Kids Drowning Accidents Are Avoidable

Looking at the number of children that lose their lives every year to drowning, something has to be done. It is the responsibility of each parent to make sure that they are covered. We all know that keeping an eye on them is simply not sufficient. Kids will be kids. The best approach is to ensure that they are equipped with the sort of skills that they require when facing said danger. We found a great resource to educate you. The video and transcript are below.

If you would like a great training resource to start teaching your child to swim. Refer to the page on the link.

It’s an accident it’s when people are so comfortable with their surroundings they don’t think something like this could happen and that’s how it happened to me I was comfortable with my surroundings until they prove you wrong. And that’s when catastrophe happens drowning is the leading cause of accidental death for children under the age of 4 in 23 states in the US nationwide it ranks second only to car accidents in all 50 states that means an average of 11 children around every day 4000 children a year lose their lives in swimming pools.

It was a dog door in the master bathroom. At the lady’s house. And he brought out of it. And somehow I don’t know he fell in the pool or gym in the pool or is grabbing for something in the pool I don’t know how I ended up in the pool that he got outside it’s estimated that for every child with rooms there’s another 4 to 6 children who end up with permanent brain damage crawled crawled. There. Down near the edge of the. Faith sat. And my son went in there and full time now what size are training just because a child one versus the full one doesn’t mean he has to die there and that’s our mission. 

The header under water. The phone interface yeah. She screamed for managing fine still was 7 months old and for children 6 months to a year in the eyes are program they learn to roll over and slow and it has to be taught sequentially so the first thing she learns as she can read on her back she wants to flow and rest and free the trust the buoyancy of the water. The white the the hair back is that it. The. And still here is having a typical reaction to the lessons right now I’m a stranger it’s a new situation for her she’s never been required to do anything in the full before and doesn’t have any still yet so you’ll notice that you hear her cry in week 2 she’ll cry even a little bit more because she’s being required to be more and more independent in the full but you’ll notice bye weeks 34 and 5 as she becomes more competent motion settle down and chill just roll over and float and stay there until someone gets hurt it’s clear that she’s not the stress she did prior to the learning process and most children do but once they’re competent in the water the crying goes away and you have a child who is a lot safer. 

Easy. Good okay. One. Grab my hand. Again. Is about yeah if they were to follow number well to be able to get to their back and then one round. Object to be able to. Jack came to lessons his first lesson is 2 years old and he walked in he walked into the pool and his parents report that he’ll just jump in because it has no fear and no respect and no skill so for an older child he’s actually gonna learn to swim until he needs air to roll over in flow and then slid back over and swim. 

What he really needed to learn first was that you can’t be vertical in the water and survive have to put your head down and swim coordinate your arms and legs and look for a way out. So his lessons involved I had to teach him to keep his head down first and then move his arms and legs then direct that back to the steps so a swim short distance. Crying and screaming and turns to. This is I don’t. My initial expectations were nervous. The online and. My kids. Right. And I. Hi 5. I wanted to do it. Can’t.

 And that’s a problem. Let’s just. That’s pretty much 6 the first week so she can independently flow by the end of week one. And make it just a job. And. On the. Just. No shoes on so good last time it was. A lot quicker and she couldn’t do it but she did awesome and then to know that right if there was. A time where. Went into the pool I mean. That’s her thing yeah so sexy seen heard successfully yeah take this out here like yeah you your pride. Now she knows that. She falls in the poll. 

Yeah fine yeah. Then bye week 3 we started I started teaching them to flow. That’s right so he he will then swim telling me there roll over and flow to try to figure out where he is and if there’s something he can swim to alert to flip back over and continue swimming but the older of the children are when they come to the program the more physically able they are so the more skills they actually learn. All week to she’s now that she knows how to flow she has to learn how to get there from the face down position and from other foster’s as well so the end result is show fallen and roll over in flow which happens generally bye week 3. 

Is the. Right away. Using her legs to get. For a little. They also come a lot of times with some bad habits that are very dangerous like they’ve been floating is our life jackets or things like that so the most important survival skills for a toddler is to keep his head down when swimming anything that’s like a dog paddle or lifting the head to try to grab the rest the kids just aren’t strong enough to survive that way so the I. S. our program teaches head down coordinated arm and leg movements roll over to float when you need air and then slip back over and swim and combine that to cover whatever distance you need to go. Maybe. 

Please. Let’s not go into. We’ll do that next week John. Now. Press. And then weeks foreign 5 she learns how to do it fully closed and she also learns how long she may have to stay there so it’s one thing to float for a few seconds and then tore combine those skills rolling over the flow for. 3040 seconds it’s another to fallen unassisted roll over and float and maintain it for however long you need to tell someone. Address. Looks around and accuser differently it touches are 2 things that so what she has now is everything set for. 

She’s going to. Why it’s confusing. In a sense it didn’t float up and tapped her on the phone. In 10. Everything’s pretty intense but it’s really magical the watcher child to learn and be able to save themselves and survive in the water that confidence of knowing if anything does happen or she does home cool to be okay. 20. And then bye week 5 he comes to lessons fully closed so that he practices those skills fully closed because most kids around when they are fully clothed not expected to be around for. You can still is lasting her parents brought her fully clothed with a diaper a T. shirt and shorts knowing that she’s fully skill the just released or into the water walked away and she got on her back and floated and that’s the the end result of the eyes or for. I. They want it now it’s just. For. Now you know now it’s like. It’s cool to watch. There’s a lot of stuff on your mind is the kid you know. And it takes away. Very proud. It’s awesome I. He. It’s a slam and not drown which is. At. For. I had my then then and roll had taken I admire classes I know 100 percent without a shadow of a doubt my son would be here today if he had had those eyes are classes with the rolling over to float the difference between life and death is literally an inch turnover.